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In the early 19th century Indiana was almost entirely covered with the deciduous hardwood forests common to the eastern United States.

Thus, Indiana’s population is to some extent black and Hispanic in the urban north and mostly white in the less industrialized south.

Though generally considered a conservative and Republican stronghold, Indiana has voted into both state and national office nearly as many Democrats as Republicans. Population (2010) 6,483,802; (2017 est.) 6,666,818. Indiana forms part of the east-central lowlands that slope downward from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River.

Its northern areas lie in the mainstream of the industrial belt that extends from Pennsylvania and New York to Illinois.

Agricultural activity is heaviest in the central region, which is situated in the Corn Belt, which stretches from Ohio to Nebraska.

Indiana, constituent state of the United States of America. states in terms of total area and, except for Hawaii, is the smallest state west of the Appalachian Mountains.

The state sits, as its motto claims, at “the crossroads of America.” It borders Lake Michigan and the state of Michigan to the north, Ohio to the east, Kentucky to the south, and Illinois to the west, making it an integral part of the American Midwest. With a name that is generally thought to mean “land of the Indians,” Indiana was admitted on December 11, 1816, as the 19th state of the union. Today Indiana’s economy is based primarily on services, manufacturing, and, to a much lesser extent, agriculture.

Although Indiana is historically part of the North, many parts of the state display a character that is much like that of the South.

This is largely a reflection of the early settlement of the region by migrants from the South, who brought with them a hearty distrust of the federal government.

Many of Indiana’s people take pride in a self-image derived largely from 19th-century America that values hard work, is oriented to the small town and medium-sized city, and is interested in maintaining the prerogatives of local self-determination.

It is not by coincidence that the Indianan’s nickname, Hoosier, remains a symbol in the country’s lore for a kind of homespun wisdom, wit, and folksiness that harks back to what is popularly regarded as a less-hurried and less-complicated period of history.

The cities near the state’s northwestern corner form an industrial, economic, and social continuum with neighbouring Chicago.